How Heathrow Airport bagged a 60% increase in use of manual handling aids 

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Airport baggage handlers provide a textbook example of a profession with a relatively high risk of injury. Moving luggage from conveyor belts into flight containers for departures and reversing the procedure for arrivals requires constant manual handling. Having invested in advanced Manual Handling Aids (MHAs), Heathrow wanted answers to two key questions:

  1. Did the MHAs actually provide significant relief, lowering the risk of musculoskeletal injuries?
  2. With staff use of MHAs low, could objective data help engage the workforce in correct use of the equipment? 


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Airport baggage handlers provide a textbook example of a profession with a relatively high risk of injury. Moving luggage from conveyor belts into flight containers for departures and reversing the procedure for arrivals requires constant manual handling. Having invested in advanced Manual Handling Aids (MHAs), Heathrow wanted answers to two key questions:

  1. Did the MHAs actually provide significant relief, lowering the risk of musculoskeletal injuries?
  2. With staff use of MHAs low, could objective data help engage the workforce in correct use of the equipment? 


Want to know what happened next?
Enter your details below to read the full case study.


HEALTHCARE WHITE PAPER

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